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A New Scholarship For Diver to Undertake GUE Training

GUE is now taking applications for its 2019 NEXTGEN scholarship aimed at 21 to 30-year old divers with at least an advanced open water certification. The Scholarship includes a year of free GUE training, travel budget, Halcyon equipment and more.

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The NextGen scholarship provides a year of training with Global Underwater Explorers to an eligible diver who wishes to advance their diving education.

As a way to empower the next generation of divers, Global Underwater Explorers (GUE) has created the NextGen Scholarship, which will provide a year of training and other benefits to deserving divers on their quest for excellence. For its inaugural year, the scholarship will support one diver, with additional diver support being added in future years.

Through the generous donation of course spaces from GUE instructors, one year of tuition-free GUE training is made available to divers. These course spaces include the majority of GUE’s curriculum, and with a generous travel budget, dedicated support from a NextGen Mentor, and a new set of gear from Halcyon, scholarship recipients are able to undertake GUE training in the locations and environments they’re most passionate about. In exchange for this support, scholars will provide both written and video documentation of their year as a NextGen scholar and take part in a NextGen presentation at the next GUE conference following their scholarship year.

If you’re a certified diver who is enthusiastic about pursuing further education, interested in exploration and conservation, and ready for a year of new adventures, learn more about the requirements and how to submit an application here.



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Art

Coral Fibergrammetry

Dive instructor cum fashion designer Erik Speer weaves macramé fiber into phantasmagorical coral-like formations.

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Text, photography and art courtesy of Erik Speer.

“I started off making basic macrame pieces about 5 years ago. I never started off with the intention of making pieces that resemble the underwater world. It just came about naturally. My first couple pieces were conglomerations of different materials and textures that I found interesting and people’s responses were always that it reminded them of coral reefs. I took that feedback and figured that I had found a way to really transfer my love of the underwater world to a medium that allowed me to share my scuba diving experiences with other people.”

“When I was in college I decided to drop out and move to Honduras to become a scuba instructor. For the next 2 years I traveled the globe teaching diving and seeing coral reefs that were both thriving and dying. I had to stop diving so much because I burst both my eardrums and risked losing my hearing for good if I kept diving daily. Those days of scuba diving are some of my most cherished memories and I love to think back on them and try to recreate the reefs and feelings I got from diving. My work is less about recreating the corals exactly as they are, but more about recreating the intrigue and wonder that diving on the reefs brought me. I want to make people curious about the underwater world and actively want to learn more and explore it on their own.”

“Yarns and fabrics were literally given to me when I was working in the fashion industry in NYC. There is such an excess of material in that industry that they are often thrown out or just left on shelves to collect dust. It was the material that I had access to so I decided to see what I could possibly do with it. It’s a great material that allows me to create unlimited amounts of textures and shapes.” 

“One square foot of a piece might contain 100 little knit “corals” where each piece took me 30 minutes to make. I usually give myself about 2 months to work on a piece. I really pride myself on making every little thing on a piece. I have been told I should outsource making sections of a piece that way I can produce more work within a year. However I don’t think the work would be the same. Anytime I feel rushed or questioned why I don’t take shortcuts to finish a piece quicker I just think about how long and coral reef takes to grow and thrive.”

“I definitely do not get to dive as much I would like. Usually just when I am on holiday. It is always a joy to get back underwater but it never lives up to when I was diving the same reef sometimes twice a day for months on end. Diving once at a site is amazing, but seeing a site day after day opens your eyes to the underwater world and how a reef is really a community that exists together.” 

“I am really inspired by the feeling and experience that SCUBA gave me and I hope my work brings a little bit of that to the viewer.”

Dive Deeper:


Born and raised in New Mexico, Erik Speer, moved to South Carolina at 15 and graduated from College of Charleston with a degree in marine biology. Went on a two year world tour teaching scuba diving. Suffered a diving accident and returned to the States and enrolled at Parsons. Graduated in December 2015 with an associate science degree in fashion design and began working in the industry. Was unfulfilled by the hands off design aspect of most fashion design so started experimenting with macrame and fiber arts. Currently focusing more on the fiber arts and experimenting with what is possible with it. Currently living in Georgia working as a full time artist.

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