Connect with us

Community

Deep Drift Diving in Cozumel

With its spectacular reef encrusted walls and irresistible current Cozumel has been a ‘Mecca’ of recreational diving for nearly thirty years; mind that 130-ft/40m depth limit! Now explorer and tech instructor Alberto Nava takes us on a journey to rediscover the parts of underwater Cozumel that single-tank tourist divers will never see. Are you ready to mix it up and conduct some unapologetically DEEP Cozumel drift diving?

Published

on

By Alberto Nava

Header photo by James Babor.

After doing all my closed circuit rebreather (CCR) critical control checks, i.e., “CHAOS,”  I jumped into the water to find myself in warm, cobalt blue water. We descended to 6 m/20 ft, did a quick bubble check, and started our descent. My automatic diluent valve (ADV) delivered a wonderful trimix 15/60 (15% O2, 60% helium) mix as I dropped down the wall and leveled off at about 60 m/197 ft. A large black grouper came to greet us, and we quickly reached the 65 m/213 ft overhang on the wall—the old coastline from the previous ice age. We followed the grouper inside the overhang and reached 80 m/263 ft. We found two large lionfish resting on a sizeable white sponge, and large strands of black corals and colorful gorgonian were all around. We turned our bodies into the current and began our 180-minute drift dive along the incredible walls of Cozumel. We were in heaven!

As we drifted along enjoying this incredible dive, my mind drifted back 20 years ago,

when I used to dive the Caribbean Sea in my home country of Venezuela. At that time, I had just become a PADI divemaster and used to take people on warm-water adventures in Venezuela’s national marine park, Los Roques Archipelago, near the island of Bonaire. As a divemaster, we limited our dives to 30 m/100 ft and closely followed the no-decompression limits. The tools of those times were single aluminum 80 (AL80) tanks, a warm-water wetsuit or no wetsuit at all on some dives, and the famous multi-level diving PADI wheeI.  

In my 20-year evolution as a diver, I’m so thankful to have found the Global Underwater Explorers (GUE) organization and its amazing mentors, which made my 180-minute dive to 70 m/230 ft seem as simple as the old single tank diving of my past. Is this for real? Can Caribbean diving be even more incredible with GUE tools? Please allow me to take you on my rediscovery of the Caribbean during the last three years, with the hope that you will also enjoy the incredible natural resource we have at our disposal.

In 1998, as technical diving was just getting started, I moved to California after spending a few years attending school in Sydney, Australia. My time in Oz had left me a bit frustrated, having experienced what I now perceive as dangerous deep air dives in the Sydney Harbor as well as in the caves of Mount Gambier, near Melbourne. I arrived in California wanting to learn to use alternative breathing gases for going deeper.

I experienced improvements on the diving procedures and gases while training with West Coast technical diving pioneer Wings Stock from Santa Cruz, where we used to breathe trimix 20/20 (20% O2, 20% helium) at 67 m/220 ft. But, it was really not until I took my GUE Tech 1 class in 2001 that deep diving came to a new light. Helium was such a wonderful gas to put in our tanks, and the more the better. For me, doing a 46  m/150 ft dive with 35% helium removed most of the ambiguities of deep diving, reduced the risk, and made deep diving a much more enjoyable experience. 

Living in Monterey, I was able to explore and document many of our deep water pinnacles, including those at Point Lobos Marine Reserve, Big Sur Banks, and others. 

Unfortunately, I quickly forgot all about the Caribbean and settled in as a cold-water California diver. During that time I also started going to Mexico to dive the amazing caves of the Yucatan Peninsula. 

Fortunately, I got better at cave diving, got into exploration, and was lucky to discover the Hoyo Negro Pit and an amazing assembly of animal and human remains from the Late Pleistocene. From 2007 to 2014, Hoyo Negro, underwater archaeology, and scientific diving were at the center of my diving world. As time went by, my distant past as a Caribbean diver faded more and more from my diving horizons. 

The Return to the Caribbean

In 2014, I reluctantly agreed to a warm-water diving vacation with my girlfriend. Cozumel was close to the caves, so I figured I could do my cave diving project, then spend a few days of diving Cozumel in order to make everybody happy. However, as soon as I jumped into the water, I recognized the warm, blue water surrounding my body and realized I had been there before; in fact, it was imprinted in my mind.

I was quickly able to find all the little creatures inhabiting the reef, including seahorses, green moray eels, and arrow crabs, and the larger creatures as well: barracudas, eagle rays, and nurse sharks. I felt about 20 years younger, having returned to my natural environment. On the second day of diving, after the divemaster gave us a check out, we ventured to the Cozumel wall. We quickly dropped to 30 m/100 ft, and I could see the wall going down, probably to 60 m/197 ft. I immediately wanted to go deeper on the wall and explore! However, considering my minimum gas reserves, equivalent narcotic depth (END), and maximum operating depth (I was diving nitrox 32), I realized that I needed the right tools.

By the end of the trip I was convinced I needed to come back to Cozumel with GUE tools. At a minimum, we needed to ditch the single tanks for doubles, or better yet a rebreather, and find a way to get helium, Softnolime, and a reliable boat operator willing to conduct some fun tech dives. 

Photo by James Babor.

I got back home and started talking to Cozumel veterans about how to get the equipment and support I would need for deeper diving. The most common answer I got was, “People in Cozumel don’t like deep diving.” There had been too many accidents, so they didn’t want to take people deep on the reef. Furthermore, my inquiries with dive operators were not successful; the best answer I got was that some shops had larger steel tanks. 

I eventually found a dive operator who was willing to conduct deep diving and had a great boat and crew. Unfortunately, the owner of the shop had had problems with GUE divers from the early “Doing It Right” era of the ‘90s, and thus was not very welcoming to me as a GUE diver or instructor. It took a lot of energy to convince him that I was a nice person, and that I was not going to call him a “stroke” or require him to wear all Halcyon dive gear. After numerous meetings, dinners, and some mescal, I finally had access to a good boat, an experienced crew, and the all-important helium. 

Fun Diving GUE Style

Over the last three years, my friends and I have conducted numerous fun dives in Cozumel and held some simple classes. Here is a description of what’s possible starting with the simplest diving and going to the more complex.

  • Recreational diving with doubles: For me, this is entry-level Caribbean diving. You get two sets of doubles filled with 32% and conduct two dives in a day. Each dive is a multiple-level “no-stop” dive on the reef with a max operating depth (MOD) of 30 m/100 ft. Total run times are around 75 min, and typical dives have three levels with 20 min at 30 m/100 ft, followed by 20 min at 18 m/60 ft, and another 20 min at 10 m/30 ft. Divers then use their remaining gas until their runtime is in the 75 min range. Our boat operator allows for two 75 min dives when doing recreational dives. This allows for good time at depth followed by fun diving along the wall. All that’s needed to participate in this type of diving is GUE fundamentals and a doubles primer.  
  • Tech 1 dives: For GUE Tech 1 divers, the equipment of choice is a set of AL80s typically filled with trimix 18/45, and a nitrox 50 (50% O2) AL80 stage for decompression. This is the perfect combination of gear to venture on the wall with a max operating depth of 52 m/170 ft (Note that GUE standards set a maximum pO2 of 1.2 atm during the working phase of the dive, and 1.6 atm during decompression), and again a run time of 75 to 85 min. Divers can multi-level their dives into two segments with 15 min spent at 52 m/170 ft and another 15 minutes at 40 m/130 ft, followed by a nice relaxing deco drifting along the shallow reef. In order to increase the fun during deco—we call it “Fun Deco”— we make the stops longer and spend more time on the reef. A typical decompression profile might be five minutes starting at 21 m/70 feet on nitrox 50, five at 18 m/60 ft, five at 15 m /50 ft, five at 12 m/40 ft, five at 9 m/30 ft, and 10 min at 26 m/20 ft. It’s easy and FUN! AL80s and wetsuits are also an ideal combination; no need for a drysuit there. During the summer months the air temperature is around 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and the water might be as warm as 87 degrees Fahrenheit. 
  • Tech 2 dives: As people want to dive deeper on the walls, GUE Tech 2 divers get either a bottom stage to increase their time at depth, or we also have low pressure LP85 tanks available for them. They typically use both nitrox 50 and O2 for decompression. The best part of the reef is the old coastline in the 60-80 m/197-262 ft range. In order to make their gas last longer, T2 divers can also multiple-level their dive, dividing their bottom time between maximum depth and time at 45 m/148 ft. In Cozumel, there is plenty to see at maximum depth. Similar to T1 divers, decompression is done on the reef and plenty of time is spent in the 12-9 m/40-30 ft range while still on the reef, until heading out to 6 m/20 ft for a bit of O2 deco. While at 6 m/20 ft, you can still enjoy diving as you look at a school of barracudas, trevally jacks, and the occasional shark. Watching turtles is one of the treats during decompression.
  • CCR dives: The ultimate Cozumel tech dives are conducted by rebreather divers. The operator allows us to drift for up to 180 minutes, but in exchange for the long bottom time, we only conduct one dive. It’s not uncommon to have bottom times in the range of 60 minutes in the 70-80 m/230-262 ft range. These profiles require longer deco but one does so drifting along the Cozumel reefs.

The CCR allows for more flexible decompression and increases the enjoyable part of the dives. It’s not uncommon to extend the stops in the 37-21 m/120-70 ft range diving inside a coral head. We often make our stops for 20 minutes every 3 m/10 ft on our way to the surface, which allows us to stay on the reef for most of the dive. Our 6 m/20 ft stop is not much longer than the previous stop, which is a big change for people accustomed to long 6 m/20 ft stop hangs.

All in all, diving Cozumel with the appropriate tools provides for an incredible experience and allows you to practice your skills in a wonderful and warm environment. I plan to organize several trips to Cozumel in 2020. I hope you’ll be able to make it.

Beto will be running a number of ‘tech” trips to Cozumel in 2020. If you are interested please contact him at: betonavab@gmail.com


Alberto “Beto” Nava is a Venezuelan-American engineer, diver, dive instructor, and explorer based in California. He has over 18 years of diving experience and has completed over 500 cave dives. His longest cave exploration penetration dive has been 4.7 km/15,500 ft. He and his group of fellow divers particularly enjoy exploring the cenotes in the Yucatan region of Mexico. 

It was on one of these excursions that he and his colleagues discovered Hoyo Negro, or “Black Hole.” The bottom of Hoyo Negro contains bones of several Ice-Age megafauna and bones of a young girl who lived 13,000 years ago. They named her Naia. This discovery started one of the most important studies of the first Americans in recent history. From 2011 to 2015, Nava was a National Geographic Explorers Grant recipient. He used the grant to continue diving and photographing Hoyo Negro. His photography is now being used in the innovative labs of the Cultural Heritage Engineering Initiative at the Qualcomm Institute at the University of California, San Diego, to create a unique 3-D experience of Hoyo Negro for those who cannot do the difficult dive and would like to experience and study the space. 
Nava has also published several papers on diving, underwater mapping, and the discovery of Hoyo Negro. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science from the Simon Bolivar National University in Venezuela and has worked as an engineer for over twenty years.

Community

LA VITA DI UN’ISTRUTTRICE SUBACQUEA ITALIANA AI TEMPI DEL CORONA

L’Italia è stato uno dei primi paesi in Europa ad essere colpito dalla pandemia del Covid19.
Abbiamo chiesto all’istruttrice subacquea Cristina Condemi di Reggio Calabria, di condividere
la sua esperienza di subacquea in quarantena. Cosa deve fare un sub?

Published

on

By

Read in English

di Cristina Condemi

Foto di Dario Condemi.

Tempo pessimo questo per parlare di sogni, di bellezza e di Mare? E che dire di quel regno che è la subacquea, un termine che apre un ampio range di significati per tutti coloro che la praticano? È impossibile riuscire ad allontanare la mente da questa pandemia e l’aumento del bilancio dei morti come la nostra inevitabile paura e il nostro buon senso, ci ricordano che dobbiamo stare a casa.

Tuttavia, un po’ alla volta, siamo riusciti a ritagliarci qualche ora nelle nostre ormai assurde giornate, per rintanarci ognuno nel proprio universo di passioni – che siano esse legate al mondo sommerso o alla terra sopra il livello del mare. Sognare è buon modo per affrontare questa situazione, un paradiso sicuro in un momento di così tale insicurezza. Allora proviamoci e sogniamo: è una delle poche cose che ci è ancora concessa e se lo facciamo non corriamo il rischio di sembrare superficiali o menefreghisti circa il Covid19 e tutto quello che sta succedendo.

Proviamoci allora e sognano nel miglior modo possibile e in qualunque momento, anche in questo preciso istante: io scrivendo le mie impressioni, le emozioni e i sogni di una subacquea italiana in quarantena nel suo appartamento di una città del sud Italia e voi leggendo queste mie parole. Ricordandoci sempre che le tempeste passano e allora potremo tornare a navigare, a tuffarci nel nostro Mare.

Lo Stretto di Messina è conosciuto per la Paramuricea clavata bicolore (Risso, 1826). Foto di Santi Cassisi.

Al momento in Italia, come in molti altri Paesi del mondo, le nostre giornate sono dettate da notizie di quanto il diffondersi del virus sia in crescita o in decrescita. Ore scandite dal trovare cosa fare chiusi nelle quattro mura di casa per non pensare troppo alla tragedia che il mondo intero sta attraversando. Soprattutto qui in Italia. Soprattutto al nord del Paese, l’aerea che si trova al lato opposto dello stivale rispetto a dove mi trovo io, ma che non ho mai sentito così vicina come adesso. Siamo sempre in attesa di un bollettino che arriva ogni giorno, sperando sempre che il picco sia passato e che finalmente arrivi il momento in cui lentamente usciamo da quella che alcuni definiscono una “guerra”. Ma che guerra non è, non ci sarà un armistizio. Non basterà la volontà di deporre le armi affinchè tutto questo abbia una fine. E allora riponiamo tutte le speranze nel fare ciò che ci ripete l’ormai famoso slogan sdoganato da tutti: dobbiamo stare a casa.

Fronteggiare l’attacco del Covid-19 

Le nostre vite sono state totalmente stravolte ormai dai primi di Marzo, almeno qui al sud Italia. Le aree più colpite come la Lombardia, soffrono anche da prima. All’inizio non ci credevamo fino in fondo, molti pensavano si trattasse di qualcosa che fosse poco più di una semplice influenza mentre coloro i quali davano un peso maggiore alla faccenda, erano considerate allarmisti. E allora questo virus si è mostrato presto per quello che realmente è, scatenando una pandemia e costringendo tutti – nessuno escluso – a una quarantena inaspettata. Da quel momento, valori un tempo altamente considerati come potere e bellezza, non avevano più nessun peso. Ci siamo resi conto che non esistono confini, non esistono barriere che possano bloccare questa avanzata. Il virus potrebbe colpire chiunque, e nessuna somma di denaro né nessuna dogana possono fermare questa avanzata.

E noi come vediamo il Coronavirus? Qui in Italia ci fa paura, ormai a tutti. La sanità pubblica ha subito molti tagli negli anni e ciò che più ci inquieta è il non avere la possibilità e il diritto di essere curati tutti, se dovessero aumentare i contagi. Le sale di terapia intensiva in alcune aree sono totalmente sature, medici e infermieri che si trovano in prima linea fanno turni estenuanti, manca il personale, mancano i dispositivi di protezione. Non eravamo davvero pronti per affrontare una pandemia, ma speriamo che questa impreparazione possa in qualche modo servire da lezione.

Oggigiorno scene come questa sembrano quasi innaturali. Foto di Maurizio Marzolla.

Ci sono varie teorie su come tutto sia cominciato: quelli che potremmo definire “complottisti”, pensano si tratti di un virus creato inizialmente in laboratori militari e che poi sia sfuggito al loro controllo. I più ecologisti, indignati con ciò che stiamo facendo al nostro pianeta, pensano che la Natura si stia ribellando e che cerchi una vendetta verso il genere umano come risposta per tutto lo stress e la sofferenza alla quale l’abbiamo costretta. Similmente, qualcuno sostiene che tali epidemie, prodotto dell’urbanizzazione sfrenata e globale, siano il risultato di un regime alimentare sbagliato. Questi ultimi individuano le cause del Covid-19 nel consumo di carne – in questo caso di maiale – proveniente da allevamenti intensivi. Dal loro punto di vista, dovremmo seguire uno stile di vita più salutare e smettere di pensare ad un ritorno alla “normalità”, perché è proprio quella normalità che avevamo prima che ci ha portato fin qui. E infine ci sono coloro i quali, ricordando epidemie passate con cui l’umanità si è già trovata faccia a faccia, credono che ci sia una sorta di inevitabile ciclicità. 

A prescindere da tutte le differenti opinioni sulla causa di questa pandemia, dobbiamo ammettere che una tragedia di tale portata è una triste novità per noi, qualcosa di inaspettato e mostruosamente enorme. E come tutti, anche io mi ritrovo a farci i conti, soprattutto in quanto appartenente a quella generazione che qui in Italia affronta non poche difficoltà, ma che mai ha vissuto una vera guerra, mai una vera carestia, figurarsi una pandemia mondiale. Forse è il male del nostro tempo e come tutti i mali, mi dico, prima o poi passerà. Speriamo almeno che ci stia insegnando qualcosa.

Il Belpaese

La bellezza dell’Italia e tutto ciò che contiene. Foto di
Giovanni Cotroneo.

Il nostro era quello che chiamavamo “il Belpaese”, ma che di bello adesso ha ben poco. Certo, restano pur sempre intatte le nostre magnifiche architetture, la nostra arte, la nostra storia e le nostre bellezze naturali e paesaggistiche, connesse anche con quel clima favorevole di cui godiamo. Ma che senso ha tutto questo per noi esseri umani, se non possiamo esserne fruitori? Che senso ha avere i musei ricchi di collezioni fondamentali da un punto di vista storico-culturale, se non possiamo più visitarli?

Non sto di certo pensando che sia giusta la loro riapertura in questo momento, ma penso che tutto questo patrimonio abbia come perso momentaneamente il proprio valore. In modo abbastanza romantico, immagino quadri impolverati, pitture di Caravaggio dove quella luce particolare che li connotava adesso si sia come spenta: opere d’arte “tristi” per non poter mostrare la loro bellezza a occhi in grado di saperla cogliere.

In modo abbastanza romantico, immagino quadri impolverati, pitture di Caravaggio dove quella luce particolare che li connotava adesso si sia come spenta: opere d’arte “tristi” per non poter mostrare la loro bellezza a occhi in grado di saperla cogliere.

Penso anche a uno dei pochissimi aspetti positivi di tutta questa assurda situazione: il Pianeta che sta riprendendo fiato, che si sta un po’ rimettendo in forma da quell’impatto devastante che negli ultimi decenni l’uomo ha avuto su di esso. Notizia che non può non far piacere, soprattutto a chi ama la Natura sopra e sotto il livello del mare. E anche se non è una grande consolazione visto il dramma che stiamo attraversando, speriamo almeno possa essere un punto di partenza per una seria riflessione su come cambiare il nostro ormai devastante stile di vita.

Un momento di crescita sopra e sotto la superficie. Foto di Luciano Forti.

Anche se usciremo distrutti, devastati o totalmente incolumi da questa tragedia, le nubi sotto le quali adesso viviamo, verranno prima o poi spazzate via. E quel giorno torneremo a rispolverare quei quadri, riempire i nostri sguardi di bellezze artistiche e naturali, godere di ogni raggio di sole all’aria aperta. 

Nel nostro caso, torneremo ad ammirare le meraviglie del mondo sommerso, sperando che sarà un’esperienza ancora più emozionante dopo questa brutta pausa. Per adesso quello che possiamo fare è aspettare. Non come dei patriottici soldati ubbidienti ai quali un governo ha ordinato una quarantena attraverso dei decreti, ma come dei cittadini solidali e consapevoli che l’isolamento aiuta noi e salva anche gli altri. 

La condivisione di ciò che siamo

Affrontando queste lunghe giornate in casa, abbiamo corso il rischio di farci risucchiare dal vortice di una paura psicotica o dalla tristezza di sentirci dei prigionieri impotenti. Per sfuggire a questo senso di isolamento, alcuni hanno portato avanti atti di solidarietà: dalla “spesa sospesa” lasciata pagata al supermercato per chi fatica ad arrivare a fine mese, a chi ha cucito le mascherine – che in questi giorni sono introvabili – e le ha consegnate a chi ne ha bisogno.

E poi in molti abbiamo trovato la forza di andare avanti grazie alle nostre passioni, ci siamo fatti coraggio, pensando anche che avremo avuto molto tempo libero per dedicarci a quello che non eravamo riusciti a fare durante la nostra occupata e “normale routine”. Eccoci allora a cercare di continuare a seguire i nostri intressi, senza però poter varcare la soglia di casa. Perché le cose che possiamo fare adesso al di fuori dei nostri nidi domestici sono solo quelle ritenute strettamente necessarie. Niente passeggiate, neanche se da soli. E purtroppo, giustamente, niente Mare.

Inizialmente è stato particolarmente difficile: abbiamo provato come un senso di spaesamento, di privazione di tutto ciò che conta davvero. Forse legato al fatto di non esserci ancora totalmente resi conto della portata di questa tragedia, ci siamo trovati a pensare solo a quanto fosse ingiusto non poter andare avanti con la nostra vita, non poter vedere i nostri affetti, non poter amare, baciare, abbracciare. Gesti del genere adesso sono diventati delle armi.

Un momento per riflettere e concentrarci sulle gioie nascoste della vita. Foto di Federica Siena

Ci siamo ritrovati improvvisamente soli con noi stessi, bloccati in questo universo asociale, che almeno per me è del tutto nuovo. Perché la vita è condivisione, proprio come la subacquea. Fare un’immersione che cosa vuol dire in fondo se non condividere una magia? Certo, alcune didattiche ci insegnano che avere un compagno è una maggiore sicurezza, e io su questo mi trovo molto d’accordo (anche se può non valere per qualche tipo di immersione più “estrema”). Ma non mi riferisco tanto a questo.

Quello che intendo è la necessità che sentiamo di condividere questa esperienza con gli altri, con tutte le sue emozioni e le sue avventure. Anche chi è abituato a fare immersione in solitaria, in realtà ha comunque un team di supporto e si trova sempre a raccontare le sue esperienze ad amici subacquei, facendo conferenze, scrivendo libri, articoli o post, per fare partecipi gli altri delle sue scoperte. Ad ogni modo, anche in questo caso la condivisione è una parte importantissima di quell’esperienza vissuta apparentemente in solitudine.

Per quanto mi riguarda invece, sono una a cui piace immergersi con gli altri. Ogni qualvolta mi capita di vedere qualcosa in lontananza e indicarlo, la gioia è come dimezzata se mi accorgo di essere stata l’unica ad aver fatto quell’avvistamento. Quando incontri qualcosa di magnifico sott’acqua, quella bellezza è sempre rafforzata dal fatto che i tuoi occhi hanno condiviso quel momento con quelli del tuo compagno. È la tua felicità amplificata da quella dell’altro. E in fin dei conti, questo è per me andare sott’acqua: una condivisione.

Quando incontri qualcosa di magnifico sott’acqua, quella bellezza è sempre rafforzata dal fatto che i tuoi occhi hanno condiviso quel momento con quelli del tuo compagno. È la tua felicità amplificata da quella dell’altro. E in fin dei conti, questo è per me andare sott’acqua: una condivisione

Corallo Nero. Foto di Santi Cassisi

Il potere speciale di noi subacquei

Ricordo ancora l’unica volta che scesi da sola a 42-43 metri circa. Era in programma un’immersione con altri tre subacquei sulla Secca della ‘Mpaddata, a Scilla, un paese a circa venti minuti di macchina da Reggio Calabria, la mia città natale. Non mi offendo se non l’avete mai sentita nominare. Quando vivevo in Galles (UK) e qualcuno mi chiedeva da dove venissi, erano molti quelli che non avevano la benché minima idea di dove fosse Reggio. E allora io cedevo a quell’unico modo che funzionava sempre: “l’italia è uno stivale, giusto? Io vengo da the toe of the boot”. E vi dico anche che la mia città, lo stretto di Messina e in particolar modo Scilla, sono il mio paradiso subacqueo.

Bene, nel giorno di quella immersione ci trovavamo a largo proprio di Scilla. Eravamo in gommone, stavamo navigando verso il sito di immersione e in quel momento mi capitò di pensare, come a volte accade, che quella non era giornata. Anche se non sapevo il perché, apparentemente non c’era un vero motivo. Arrivati sul punto prefissato, buttammo giù l’ancora e cominciammo a prepararci. Mentre mi vestivo e indossavo l’attrezzatura, mi accorsi di non avere il mio computer e allora a quel punto decisi che quello era per me il momento di abortire l’immersione. Sapevo che non avrei dato noia a nessuno, conoscevo i miei compagni, non mi avrebbero forzata né mi avrebbero fatto sentire alcuna pressione. Perché quello che mi hanno insegnato, che hanno pensato loro in quel momento – ne sono certa – e che ho pensato anch’io, è che un bravo subacqueo è anche quello che sa dire di no. Gli altri scesero, io rimasi in gommone con chi ci faceva da supporto barca quel giorno e tutto andò per il verso giusto.

Una volta terminata l’immersione, il gommonauta cominciò a tirare su l’ancora, ma si era incagliata. Dopo diversi minuti e diversi tentativi falliti, pensammo che qualcuno doveva scendere a disincagliarla o, meglio, avremmo potuto più saggiamente legare un gavitello alla cima per ritornare più tardi e fare qualche altro tentativo. Ma visto che io non ero scesa, non avendo azoto residuo in corpo e quella riluttanza ad immergermi era sparita, mi offrì volontaria. Indossai la mia attrezzatura ed entrai in acqua. Dopo un ultimo sguardo ai compagni in barca, scaricai il GAV, svuotai i miei polmoni e scesi lungo la cima.

Buoni compagni d’immersione e veri amici. Foto per gentile concessione di Cristina Condemi.

Arrivata sul fondo, vidi l’ancora incastrata dietro uno sperone di roccia. Provai a tirare un po’ di cima verso il basso per allentare la tensione e cercare di smuovere l’ancora. Mentre ero intenta a fare questa operazione mi capitò una cosa che spesso succede a noi subacquei. Forse non a tutti e non sempre, ma abituati a comunicare in un modo alternativo quando siamo immersi in un liquido dove le parole diventano inutili e incomprensibili, è come se fossimo capaci di amplificare le nostre percezioni. È come se avessimo un dono, la capacità di percepire delle cose, delle energie, delle presenze intorno a noi.

Vi giuro che non sto diventando matta. Non vi è mai successo? Avere la sensazione che alle vostre spalle ci sia qualcosa, voltarvi improvvisamente e trovarvi faccia a faccia con una meravigliosa creatura? Ho avuto modo di parlare di questa idea con persone che non mi hanno preso per una squinternata, anzi, si sono trovati d’accordo con me. E mi piace pensare che sia proprio un “potere speciale” che noi subacquei possediamo, una magia tutta nostra.

Tornando al momento dell’ancora, mi capitò esattamente quella sensazione, una presenza dietro di me, così mi fermai un attimo pur essendo parecchio indaffarata e mi girai. E cosa vidi? In quel preciso momento un’aquila di mare si stava dirigendo verso di me, forse incuriosita dalla mia presenza e dai miei movimenti sicuramente ai suoi occhi a dir poco buffi. Mi venne molto vicina, io provai a stare immobile e trattenni il respiro per evitare di spaventarla.

Un’aquila di mare come quella che volò sopra di me. Foto di Santi Cassisi.

Fu come se mi stesse puntando, ma lentamente. “Sorvolò” sopra di me, ad un palmo dalla testa e la seguì con lo sguardo. Fu un momento magico, grazie proprio a quelle sensazioni uniche che riusciamo ad avere noi subacquei – o alla pura e meno magica casualità, lascio a voi la scelta. Ma in quello stesso istante ho pensato a quanto avrei voluto che ci fosse stato qualcuno con me. Vedere la mia gioia rispecchiata negli occhi del mio compagno, in quelle grandi sfere blu spalancate che sorridono dietro la sua frameless, avrebbero reso questo momento ancora più memorabile.

Siamo animali sociali

E insomma, così è la vita: noi esseri umani forse necessitiamo di momenti di solitudine, di introspezione, di riflessione intima con noi stessi, ma siamo in fin dei conti degli “animali sociali” che hanno bisogno di condividere le proprie esperienze con gli altri. E in questo periodo ce ne stiamo rendendo conto più che mai. Ne è prova il fatto che, figli del nostro tempo, costretti in quarantena passiamo molte ore al telefono, chiamando, scrivendo o videochiamando amici cari e quelli che non sentivamo da un po’. Viviamo molto il mondo dei social – parola non a caso – con le continue dirette di qualsiasi genere e tema.

Nel nostro caso, seguiamo apneisti e subacquei che raccontano di record e di scoperte. Usiamo applicazioni per parlare in videoconferenza di immersioni in grotta, di fotografia subacquea, o più in generale del Mare e delle emozioni che ci regala. Anche per chi non era così avvezzo al mondo di internet, ha ceduto, perché questo è il solo modo che abbiamo adesso per condividere. Ora più che mai, abbiamo bisogno degli altri, di incontrarci e non potendolo fare fisicamente, ci accontentiamo di quello che ci regala il farlo virtualmente attraverso uno schermo.

Qualcosa per cui sperare. Foto di Giovanni Cotroneo.

Inevitabilmente ci troviamo a parlare anche del virus e di come siamo arrivati a tutto questo. E riflettiamo anche su come sarà la fase successiva, quando si tenterà di riportare le nostre vite ad una “normalità”, per quanto ancora dovremo vivere con la paura di infettarci e infettare, ma anche speranzosi di qualche cambiamento positivo nelle nostre abitudini. 

Il pensare al dopo però, pur essendo anche questa in qualche modo una grossa preoccupazione, è una cosa positiva e può voler dire che ne stiamo venendo fuori. Viviamo anche dei momenti di solitudine e di introspezione nei quali facciamo un po’ il punto della situazione con noi stessi e ci chiediamo cosa ci manca davvero: i nostri amori, il lavoro e tutte quelle attività che siamo soliti svolgere con gli altri. Ma visto che questa è una rivista subacquea, sono certa che voi lettori capirete benissimo quando menziono quanto mi manca il Mare. 

Che sia voglia di tuffarsi ai tropici, nel mio amato Mediterraneo, negli Oceani o nei laghi. A noi subacquei manca tanto quel mondo sommerso. Ma sappiamo anche che ci sta aspettando e che ritroveremo prima o poi il nostro mare, così blu, bello e forte come sempre. Con una differenze: la piena consapevolezza che adesso dobbiamo proteggerlo con tutte le nostre forze.

A noi subacquei manca tanto quel mondo sommerso. Ma sappiamo anche che ci sta aspettando e che ritroveremo prima o poi il nostro mare, così blu, bello e forte come sempre. Con una differenze: la piena consapevolezza che adesso dobbiamo proteggerlo con tutte le nostre forze.


Cristina Condemi è un’istruttrice subacquea RAID ed un membro dello Scilla Diving Center. È nata a Reggio Calabria e il mare dello Stretto di Messina è sempre stato il suo ambiente naturale. Laureata al DAMS (Discipline dell’Arte, delle Musica e dello Spettacolo) dell’Università di Bologna, ha vissuto in Spagna e in Galles. Guida subacquea nel mare di Scilla dal 2014, accompagna subacquei di ogni livello alla scoperta di questi straordinari fondali e delle creature che li abitano, con un particolare riguardo per il rispetto di questo fragile ecosistema: un’attenzione che cerca di trasmettere anche ai suoi allievi. Ecologista, vegana e animalista, pratica immersioni tecniche dal 2018, scrivendo in rete il racconto delle sue esperienze come subacquea.

Continue Reading

Subscribe

Submerge yourself in our content by signing up for our monthly newsletters. Stay up to date and on top of your diving.

Thank You to Our Sponsors

Education