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Density Discords: Understanding and Applying Gas Density Research

Do you know the density of your breathing gas at your planned working depth? New research conducted by Gavin Anthony and Simon J. Mitchell suggests that you better! A gas density of 6 grams/liter (g/l)—the equivalent of diving nitrox 32 at 110 ft/34 m, or trimix 18/35 at 200 ft/61 m—significantly increased the risk of dangerous CO2 retention, resulting in test subjects experiencing problems at three times the rate of divers using gas even 1 g/l less dense. Divers Alert Network risk mitigation leader Reilly Fogarty explains.

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By Reilly Fogarty

Header photo by Derek Remmers

As divers we’ve learned to adapt to the effects of depth without fully understanding the mechanisms behind them. Gas density is one of those misunderstood dynamics lurking in the background of many of our dives. We minimize our work at depth, improve our fitness, and add helium to reduce narcosis and work of breathing (WOB) at depth, but these are reactionary responses. While we typically can’t discern the difference during a dive, gas density and the accompanying increase in WOB causes decreased respiratory capacity, increased CO2 production, and decreased ability to eliminate CO2 in the blood. Some agencies (e.g., GUE) have been proactive in modifying standard gases and tailoring training to adapt to these concerns, but the forefront of hyperbarics research is constantly pushing us toward increasingly conservative gas choices.

Just to clear the air, we’re working with two terms here — WOB and gas density. WOB is an integral of pressure as a function of volume that’s used to measure the effort required to breathe. A high WOB means it takes more effort (measured in energy, typically joules) to draw breath (a measure of volume, typically in liters). High WOB results in increased CO2 production, and that CO2 increase can result in hypercapnia, narcosis, and loss of consciousness among other symptoms.

Gas density is a measure of mass per unit volume, measured in grams per liter (g/l). A high gas density means a given volume of gas weighs more and takes more effort to move, resulting in increased WOB. Increased gas density also skews the pressure gradient between inspired and arterial CO2, resulting in further decreased CO2 off gassing efficiency and a recurring system that results in further complications.

In the past, these factors were taken for granted, but recent research by Gavin Anthony and Simon J. Mitchell from the University of Auckland Department of Anaesthesiology (see link below) has cast gas density in a new light. Working with both open-circuit and rebreather divers, Anthony and Mitchell found that gas density near the 6 g/l mark significantly increased the risk of dangerous CO2 retention during dives, resulting in their test subjects failing more than half their attempted dives and experiencing issues at more than three times the rate of divers using gas even 1 g/l less dense. Their takeaway from this research was an ideal maximum gas density of 5.2 g/l (equivalent to air at 102 fsw/31 msw), and a hard maximum of 6.2 g/l (equivalent to air at 128 fsw/39 msw).

The implications of these results are both complex and far-reaching. Recreational and technical divers alike face issues with gas density under these new guidelines. The use of EANX 32 (32% oxygen, 68% nitrogen) at 110 fsw/34 msw exceeds recommendations with a gas density of 5.66 g/l and more than 6.54 g/l at 132 fsw/40 msw. Technical divers using trimix 18/35 (18% oxygen, 32% helium, balance nitrogen) will overshoot recommendations, reaching 6.93 g/l at 200 fsw/61 msw and a PO2 of just 1.26, and trimix 10/70 (10% oxygen, 70% helium, balance nitrogen) reaches an impressive 6.73 g/l at 396 fsw/121 msw and 10.29 g/l at 495 fsw/151 msw.

Checking supplies. Photo courtesy of GUE archives.

The reality is that gas density is another in a series of dynamic risk factors that divers of all levels must contend with. Treating gas density like DCS by acknowledging and mitigating the hazards via personal fitness, decreased work at depth, and appropriate dive planning has worked in the past and will continue to work. What this research shows us is why we face the issue we do at depth, a possible understanding of corollary hazards like DCS and IPE, and how we might be able to use that data to keep ourselves safer.

View the Respiratory Physiology of Rebreather Diving research in full. For questions about gas density or comments about this and future articles, reach out to the author at RFogarty@DAN.org.

Gas Density Calculator

Here is a simple gas density calculator for you to download, created by Brendon Allen aka RainPilot, at ScubaBoard.com, that enables one to calculate the gas density of their bottom mix at their planned depth (in ATA). It also includes equivalent narcotic depth (END), and partial pressure of oxygen (PPO2) at the planned max depth.


Reilly Fogarty is a team leader for its risk mitigation initiatives at Divers Alert Network (DAN). When not working on safety programs for DAN, he can be found running technical charters and teaching rebreather diving in Gloucester, MA. Reilly is a USCG licensed captain whose professional background also includes surgical and wilderness emergency medicine as well as dive shop management.

Diving Safety

RTC Launches New Rebreather Safety Initiative

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Header image: Rebreather diver wearing their MRS. Photo courtesy of rEVO.

In January 2021, the Rebreather Training Council (RTC) began developing several new safety initiatives in addition to its ongoing work on the advancement and development of rebreather training standards. RTC launched the first of these rebreather safety initiatives in March in an effort to reduce rebreather fatalities. 

Specifically, the initiative has been designed to educate and inform divers about the advantages of using mouthpiece retaining straps (MRS). The RTC now recommends the use of an MRS when diving a rebreather. It further recommends that rebreather divers be taught about the advantages of an MRS during their training, and that vendors supply them with their rebreathers (as is required according to the European rebreather standard EN14143). 

It is widely acknowledged that the use of rebreathers increases the probability of exposure to an inappropriate breathing gas, which can lead to a Loss of Consciousness (LoC). As sport rebreather diving community leaders, the RTC and its members believe the specific risk of water aspiration following LoC underwater must be proactively mitigated. An MRS is an easy-to-use, easy-to-fit device that prevents the mouthpiece from being lost in the event of (LoC), and can therefore minimize the risk of immediate drowning.

A mouthpiece retaining strap (MRS). Photo courtesy of AP Diving

According to Mark Caney, President of the RTC, “There is good evidence that Mouthpiece Retaining Straps have meaningful safety benefits, so we hope that all rebreather divers will take time to learn how these simple devices are deployed and embrace their use whenever practical.” He was joined by RTC vice chair Paul Toomer, “I have been using an MRS on my rebreather for some time now and I’m really happy to see such a great safety initiative being released into the mainstream,” he said.

The RTC’s desire is that all divers, instructors, and manufacturers will embrace this initiative as we continue to strive to make our sport ever safer. For a detailed explanation of the use and safety advantages of MRS, see MOUTHPIECE RETAINING STRAP SAFETY GUIDANCE NOTICE posted on the RTC website.

Additional Resources:

BSAC Webinar: Increasing The probability of Surviving Loss of Consciousness Underwater When Using A rebreather

InDepth: Can Mouthpiece Retaining Straps Improve Rebreather Diving Safety?
Where do Agencies and Manufactures Stand on Mouthpiece Restraining Straps?

A Mouthpiece Restraining Strap Just Might Save Your Life
—We surveyed CCR divers from around the world on MRS: Here are the results.

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