fbpx
Connect with us

Latest Features

Dr. Bill Talks Mix

The late great decompression physiologist, Dr. R. W. “Bill” Hamilton played a unique role in the early development and emergence of technical diving. Listen to “Dr. Bill” and cave diver nurse anesthetist John Crea discuss “special mix” diving at the TEK.95 conference (1995).

Published

on

by Michael Menduno

Header photo: RW “Bill” Hamilton speaking at TEK.94 in New Orleans, La. aquaCORPS archives

Decompression physiologist Dr. R.W. “Bill” Hamilton played a unique and critical role in the early development of technical diving by providing his considerable expertise and “special mix” decompression tables to numerous pioneers of what would become known as “technical diving.” While many in the recreational diving establishment and the hyperbaric community were skeptical of the viability and efficacy of tech diving, and in many cases opposed it all together, Dr. Bill recognized the legitimacy of exploration divers needing to find a way to go deeper and stay longer. 

As Bill often explained, he would first try to talk divers out of making a “Big Dive,” and if he couldn’t, and believed the individuals in question did not have a death wish, he would help them figure out how to conduct their dive safely using mixed gas technology. In doing such, he brought needed credibility to the fledgling technical diving community.  

John Crea and Bill Hamilton at the TEK.95 Legal Narcosis session.

Through his Tarrytown, NY-based company, Hamilton Research Ltd., Bill worked with individuals like famed cave explorer Sheck Exley, and explorer Parker Turner, cofounder of the Woodville Karst Plain Project (WKPP). He also worked with caver Bill Stone, whose 1987 Wakulla Springs Project inspired early tekkies, and provided the Key West Consortium trimix tables, used by tech pioneer Capt. Billy Deans for his dive operation at Key West Diver, Key West, Florida, which was one of the first technical diving training centers on the planet. 

Dr. Bill was the first recipient of the aquaCORPS “Tekkie” Award at TEK.93. Photo: aquaCORPS archives.

Bill was also instrumental in helping me produce aquaCORPS Journal (1990-1996) and was the first member of my aquaCORPS editorial board, and a regular speaker at our TEK.Conferences. We awarded him with the first “Tekkie Award” at the TEK.93 conference in Orlando, FL. Bill passed away on September 16, 2011, and didn’t get to see just how far tech diving has come. It would make him happy.

Here, in a talk from aquaCORPS TEK.95 conference held in January, 1995 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, Bill Hamilton and John Crea, who was also instrumental in producing custom decompression tables for the cave diving community, including the first oxygen decompression tables, discuss the ins and outs of “mix diving,” as seen from the vantage point of 1995. The introducer is Fred Garth, founder and publisher of Scuba Times magazine.

Mixed Diving with Dr. RW Bill Hamilton and John Crea

Additional Resources:

Check out Dr. Bill’s perspective on the emergence of technical diving in his seminal article from aquaCORPS #1 UnderPressure, “Call It High Tech Diving.” 

In Memoriam: Joel Silverstein’s The Prince of Gases: RW “Bill Hamilton (1930-2011) in X-Ray magazine.

Divers Alert Network created the annual $10,000 R.W. “Bill” Hamilton Dive Medicine Research Grant. Apply for the grant here.

Past RW “Bill” Hamilton Grant Recipients

Download a Free Copy of aquaCORPS #4: MIX (with a 1992 “MIX Primer” by John Crea and Michael Menduno) and aquaCORPS #7 C2.


Be a Part of Diving History!

The Historical Diving Society USA is a non-profit organization dedicated to serving the dive community by:

• Researching, archiving and promoting great moments in dive history.

• Honoring the contributions of underwater pioneers.

• Facilitating access to the rich history of diving on various platforms.

• Enhancing awareness of and appreciation for underwater exploration.

To access our treasure trove of dive history and become a member, visit us at: www.HDS.org. We are also on Facebook: Historical Diving Society USA


Michael Menduno is InDepth’s editor-in-chief and an award-winning reporter and technologist who has written about diving and diving technology for 30 years. He coined the term “technical diving.” His magazine aquaCORPS: The Journal for Technical Diving (1990-1996), helped usher tech diving into mainstream sports diving. He also produced the first Tek, EUROTek, and ASIATek conferences, and organized Rebreather Forums 1.0 and 2.0. Michael received the OZTEKMedia Excellence Award in 2011, the EUROTek Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012, and the TEKDive USA Media Award in 2018. In addition to his responsibilities at InDepth, Menduno is a contributing editor for DAN Europe’s Alert Diver magazine and X-Ray Magazine, a staff writer for DeeperBlue.com, and is on the board of the Historical Diving Society (USA)


Community

Our Most Read Stories of 2020

Dive into our most read stories of 2020. Can cameras kill? What about those peculiar GUE rebreathers? Gradient factors anyone? Was it a world record dive? Find out.

Published

on

By

Header photo by Sean Romanowski

Greetings Tekkies,

This December marks the second full year of publishing InDepth, and what a crazy year it’s been. With the pandemic still raging throughout most of the world, it has been a most challenging year for the diving industry, as I’m sure you’re aware. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, our readers for your continuing interest and support, and also thank our thoughtful contributors who make the blog possible.

Over the last year, we published nearly 100 InDepth stories covering the latest developments in exploration, technology, training, conservation, diving science & medicine, image making and technical diving culture. We also added select translations into Chinese, Italian, and Spanish . In doing so, I believe that we have grown our coverage in terms of breadth, depth and sophistication. Call it, a geeky labor of love!

In addition, we’ve added some depth-full sponsors to the mix, that have made it possible to grow and sustain InDepth. Our special thanks to DAN Europe, Dive Rite, Divesoft, Fourth Element, Halcyon, The Human Diver, and Shearwater Research. May your brands continue to flourish! 

Similar to 2019, we celebrate the coming new year with our Most Read Stories from 2020/2019. If you like what you read, please SUBSCRIBE, it’s free! That will ensure you’ll get our latest stories and content delivered to your inbox. Here’s to a hopefully wet and most excellent 2021!

—Michael Menduno/M2


Photo by Natalie Gibb

1. Cameras Kill Cavers Again 

Cave explorer, photographer and instructor Natalie L Gibb wants to make “taking pictures” the sixth rule accident analysis. How can toting a camera underground get you into trouble? Take a breath, clip off your camera, and say cheese, Gibb will explain.

Photo by Ortwin Khan

2. The Thinking Behind GUEs Closed Circuit Rebreather Configuration 

GUE is known for taking its own holistic approach to gear configuration. Here GUE board member and Instructor Trainer Richard Lundgren explains the reasoning behind its unique closed-circuit rebreather configuration. It’s all about the gas!

Photo by Joakim Hjelm.

3. Gradient Factors in a Post Deep Stop World 

World-recognized decompression physiologist and cave explorer David Doolette explains the new evidence-based findings on “deep stops,” and shares how and why he sets his own gradient factors. His recommendations may give you pause to stop (shallower).

Image courtesy of DeeperBlue.com.

4. Fact or Fiction: Revisiting the Guinness World Record Dive 

Newly released information calls into question the validity of former Egyptian Army Colonel and instructor trainer Ahmed Gabr’s 2014 world record scuba dive to 332 m/1,090 ft in the Red Sea. InDepth editor-in-chief Michael Menduno reports on what we’ve learned, why this information is coming out now, and what it all may mean.

Photo courtesy of Sea Shepherd.

5. Can We Save Our Planet? What About Ourselves? Interview With Sea Shepherd founder Paul Watson.

Managing editor Amanda White poses the BIG questions to environmental activist Captain Paul Watson, founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and the architect behind its strategy of aggressive non-violence. His answers may surprise you—and even bring you to tears. What motivates the 70-year Environmental Hero of the 20th Century to keep up the fight despite widespread ignorance, apathy and greed? Find out.

Photo by Derk Remmers.

6. Isobaric Counter Diffusion in the Real World 

Isobaric counterdiffusion is one of those geeky, esoteric subjects that some tech programs deem of minor relevance, while others regard it as a distinct operational concern. Divers Alert Network’s Reilly Fogarty examines the physiological underpinnings of ICD, some of the key research behind it, and discusses its application to tech diving.

Photo courtesy of Michal Guba.

7. Deepest Freshwater Flooded Abyss in the World 

The efforts to explore and map Hranice Abyss, located in Hranice (Přerov District) in the Czech Republic span more a century. Currently, the monstrous chasm is known to reach 384 m/1260 ft deep. Explorer and member of the Czech Speleological Society Michal Guba has the deets.

Photo by Rich Denmark.

8. Urination Management Considerations for Women Technical Divers

Tech diver and doctoral student, Payal Razdan, offers an in-depth review of the options available to women tech divers for handling the call of nature.

Photo by Kirill Egorov.

9. Situational Awareness and Decision Making In Diving

Situational awareness is critical to diving safety, right? But how much of your mental capacity should be devoted to situational monitoring, e.g., How deep am I? How much gas do I have? Where is my buddy? Where is my boat? More importantly, how does one develop that capacity? Here GUE Instructor Trainer Guy Shockey, who is also a human factors or non-technical skills instructor, explores the nature and importance of situational awareness, and what you can do to up your game.

10. Examining Early Technical Diving Deaths

The early days of technical diving were marred by an alarming number of fatalities that threatened the viability of this emerging form of diving. Here InDepth editor-in-chief Michael Menduno presents the original accident analyses of 44 incidents that resulted in 39 fatalities and 12 injuries, as reported in aquaCORPS Journal and technicalDIVER in the early to mid 1990s.

11. A Voice In The Wilderness

Just when you thought you’ve seen it all, along comes underground picture-maker SJ Alice Bennett, who is shedding new light on the dark, moody, twisting karst passageways that form what explorer Jill Heinerth calls “the veins of Mother Earth.” If you’re ready for a new perspective on the ‘doing of cave diving,’ switch on your primary and dive right in.


Continue Reading

Subscribe

Education, Conservation, and Exploration articles for the diving obsessed. Subscribe to our monthly blog and get our latest stories and content delivered to your inbox every Thursday.

Thank You to Our Sponsors

Education