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Confessions of a Lifestyle Image Maker

Pioneered by Patagonia, lifestyle marketing is all the rage in sports and active lifestyle circles. Meet Luke Inman, the man who’s bringing lifestyle image-making to diving and titillating buyers along the way. He says we need more industry solidarity, and a lot more women divers. Interview by Michael Menduno.

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by Michael Menduno

Forty five-year-old British ex-pat Luke Inman has carved out a unique niche in the diving industry working as an award-winning filmmaker and photographer, and a dive shop owner based in La Paz, Mexico. Having graduated from the London International Film School, he has shot film and photographs for The BBC, Castle Rock Entertainment, Discovery Channel and Animal Planet, Lucas Films, the Mexican Tourist Bureau, The Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Geographic, as well as major brands like American Express and Playboy. He also won an MTV Latin America Best Video award.

Inman is also a passionate diver and dive educator who been teaching scuba for 22 years. In addition to being a PADI course director and Tec instructor trainer (IT), he is an IANTD, RAID and TDI mix and rebreather instructor, a DAN instructor trainer, HSE commercial diver Part 3 & 4, and is now training to become a GUE Fundies instructor. He has owned and operated Cortez Expeditions, a Five-Star Dive Centre in La Paz since 2015,

In the last few years, Inman, has turned his attention to “lifestyle” image making working with diving brands like Apex, Fourth Element, Neptunic, Halcyon, PADI, and others. If you are reading this blog, you have likely seen some of his compelling diving lifestyle images. We asked him to talk to us about his newly found focus on lifestyle and its importance to the business of diving.

Photo of Charlotte Holmes by Luke Inman for Fourth Element’s new Ocean Positive Collection.

InDepth: So, let me get this straight. You’ve recently completed three major diving “lifestyle” shoots and all of them are with women. No men at all. How did that come about? Are vendors just going to focus on women divers now, or is this, in fact, like your new dream job?

Luke Inman: Ha ha! Maybe a bit of both. First Jim Standing, at Fourth Element said that he wanted to empower women with their new line. PADI, whom  I have been working with, wanted me to shoot a film for Women’s Dive Day. And then I was approached by Mark Messersmith and Lauren Fanning at Halcyon who wanted me to do a lifestyle shoot to promote their new back plate and colors for women, and or for men who fancy pink and teal. It was equipment-based but there were no diving shots involved.

I’m guessing your pretty comfortable working with that other gender.

It goes back to my early days of recreational diving. I think being small in stature, and always being the youngest, gave me a lot of empathy for the women. I would comment or give an opinion, even as an instructor, and the old, chauvinistic, macho divers would class me with the women. I would get sort of pushed aside. “No, you go with the females. You’re too young, and you don’t know anything.” Of course, the reality is I was already a commercial diver with hundreds of hours before I ever did my PADI open water, much less instructor course.

You had your baptism of fire in high-end lifestyle photography in the surf and snowboarding industry working with Quiksilver. How does that translate to diving? Do you find that lifestyle marketing is beginning to resonate with the diving industry?

Lifestyle photography is something new that has emerged with social media and has quickly become an essential part of marketing and promotion for many companies. I think that the dive training agencies from PADI to GUE are just beginning to realize how important it is in branding, that is promoting the lifestyle rather than just training. And you’re starting to see that with some of the manufacturers like Fourth Element, Halcyon and others as well.

Photo of Ivonne Arambula and Charlotte Holmes by Luke Inman for Fourth Element’s new Ocean Positive Collection.

As an example of the power of lifestyle branding, I think we could walk out on the street right now, and find somebody wearing a Patagonia or North Face T-shirt or jacket that has never climbed a mountain. You could also likely find someone wearing a Quiksilver Tee that has never surfed or seen snow. Social media helps with that as well.

Conversely, I doubt seriously that you could find anyone wearing a PADI, or GUE, Scubapro, Sherwood or Poseidon T-shirt, or any article of clothing from the diving industry who wasn’t a diver, because people that aren’t divers just don’t think it’s cool enough. Fourth Element may become the exception.

Why is that?

To me, Fourth Element is the only brand that reaches outside of the dive industry in terms of fashion and lifestyle. They are in like some 200 FatFace active lifestyle stores in Great Britain and that buyer doesn’t care that there’s not even water in some of the photographs. The store buyers just want to know that Fourth Element divers don’t model bikinis for Billabong. Obviously, we go with the aesthetic. So on a very small scale, Fourth Element is a featherweight boxer fighting in the heavyweight division.

Ha! I like that! And I think Fourth Element’s imagery is always James Dean cool. Why haven’t other manufacturers picked up on that?

I think one of the problems is that the manufacturers seem so hell-bent on just producing and selling products rather than lifestyle. You can see that at DEMA [the annual diving industry trade show]. I think that the equipment should almost play second fiddle to the lifestyle and the clothing.

It’s clothing that saved the surf industry. They don’t make any money on neoprene and fiberglass surfboards. The surf industry is a billion-dollar industry because it’s become a fashion industry.

Now I don’t think the dive industry needs to become fashion driven, by  any stretch of the imagination, but we do need to add lifestyle to grow. And I think it’s become important to the agencies, because the training is more unified across agencies.

Meaning its harder to differentiate training among agencies? I certainly see PADI moving in the lifestyle direction.

That’s been part of my work as well. I’m responsible for some of that.

Video by Luke Inman for PADI’s Women’s Dive Day 2017. Divers/Models: Morgan Sanchez, dive instructor, Gemma Smith, Cave and Technical Diving Instructor, Afrelandra.

On the three lifestyle shoots we’ve been talking about, you used some of your staff as models. How did that come about?

I was consulting with Fourth Element. And I’ll be perfectly honest with you, Jim [Standing] turned around to me one day and he went, two of the women that work for you have got a lot of credibility as divers. They’re both tech divers. Karla is PADI divemaster. Afelandra is a PADI Ambassador and she’s has taken Fundamentals. They’re both also very photogenic. Do us a favor and don’t charge us too much money, but can you produce something with them within our budget?

And it kind of snowballed from there because we wanted to make sure that the models that we were using were credible as divers.  And as I was saying, there also has to be an aesthetic to satisfy buyers outside of the dive industry. So we tried to kill as many birds as we could with one stone and also to do it as cheaply as possible.

Photo of Karla Rodriguez by Luke Inman for Fourth Element’s Thermocline Collection.

And store buyers have been happy with the result?

It’s been very positive. Funny story. One of the Fourth Element reps called on a buyer in the Midwest. The female buyer pulled out the catalog and pointed at a Fourth Element photo and said when are you going to stop using these skinny models? Women in my store don’t associate with this girl. It’s not fair. She’s like a perfect 10.

And the sales rep was like, “that’s Karla. She’s a crossfit champion and a divemaster. She’s got a Master’s degree in fish ecology and regularly dives to 200 feet.” And the buyer was just blown away by this information and said,  “why aren’t you promoting this?” Slowly and surely we are; Fourth Element is trying to get that message out.

They’re not just pretty faces; they’re accomplished people in dive world. Do you think it comes through that these are real divers and not just models?

I think that we need to start telling the girls’ stories a bit more, and that’s the beauty of social media. However, what’s very important and does come across is the camaraderie of us all working and shooting together. Everyone is happy and most important, the girls are comfortable wearing the gear because they are divers. With some of the mainstream brands, you can tell that the models are not divers or at least very inexperienced ones.

I really like the idea of showing real people doing real things. But unfortunately, I think we are still at a stage where they have to be very photogenic for it to be a hook. Still the emphasis needs to be on the product, the diving and the lifestyle, and just cool people using the product as opposed to, here’s a pretty girl, let’s slap a jacket on her.

Photo of Charlotte Holmes by Luke Inman for Fourth Element’s new Ocean Positive Collection.

It has to inspire!

It’s very important that we inspire people. We had a young dive master candidate approach us and her whole motivation to get into diving was seeing what these girls do for a lifestyle; you can be a strong woman and still look good. I think that’s helped with Fourth Element making equipment and clothing that can stand up and compete with Patagonia and North Face, although on a smaller scale.

Photo of Ivonne Arambula by Luke Inman for Fourth Element.

I heard that Fourth Element co-founder Paul Strike showed images from your Ocean Positive bikini shoot at his talk at the United Nations World Ocean Day celebration last year.

I was really proud of that. I’m also proud to have been recognized as a lifestyle photographer, because there aren’t many in our industry!

Are there any unique challenges to making diving lifestyle photography?

Within the diving industry, it’s definitely budget. I have shot a bikini special for FHM magazine. I have also shot for Playboy and of course Quiksilver. And the resources you’re given when you shoot for Quiksilver or Playboy or FHM are completely different than a shoot for Aqua Lung, Halcyon or Fourth Element. [Inman rolls his eyes] It’s very, very different!

Ha. Having worked in Silicon Valley, Wall Street, and in the diving business for more than a few decades, I completely understand.

Another issue that we suffer from is this: if you put a diving image online, even if it’s aimed at non-divers, divers are going to criticize it. Someone is going to notice that the low-pressure hose is not connected properly, or a D-ring is too far forward, or her knees are too low in trim position. In almost all cases, the criticism is from men.

Photo of Charlotte Holmes by Luke Inman for Fourth Element’s new Ocean Positive Collection.

There are somes times when dive world feels like a combat sport.

I would like to see more cohesiveness and solidarity in the dive industry and that’s one of the reasons I think we need more women; because they have a far better approach. Men are competitive and are quick to apply ego. They are quick to attack. “Oh look, look at him, his buoyancy is no good. Or that agency is no good.”

Women tend to be more nurturing and I think we need to nurture one another better. As one of my friends and mentors, Paul Toomer [training director of RAID] has been saying to everyone who will listen, we need to stop attacking each other. It’s hurting the dive industry.

I think Toomer is spot-on!

I remember Jim [Standing] saying that he went on a dive boat on the south coast without a buddy and had a standup battle with a diver. I won’t say which agency but they were wearing Jet Fins. He wouldn’t dive with Jim because he didn’t have a long hose. “You know, we are both capable divers,” Jim offered, “let’s just go diving.”

I think there’s quite a bit of competitiveness that is ego driven and unnecessary in our industry, which is one of the reasons I like working predominantly with girls. I just did an instructor course that, out of the nine candidates, seven were girls and only two guys. And the whole dynamic was so much more nurturing and about helping one another.

Some estrogen with that gas mix?

I think we need a big injection of the feminine in the dive industry!

Photo of Charlotte Holmes and Ivonne Arambula by Luke Inman for Fourth Element’s new Ocean Positive Collection.

Overall the diving industry is pretty conservative. Have you any amusing or unusual incidents where you pushed the images a bit too far, where clients or consumers gave you a hard time.

[Inman laughs] There’s been couple of incidents. I was shooting for PADI Women’s Dive Day. The plan was for me to film this beautiful Latina girl, who’s a PADI course director snorkeling in a bikini. And I started filming her and thought, we could never use this because, err she’s, I believe the expression would be, very well-endowed. And I took the footage back to the boat and I was like, we’re going to have to reshoot this with her in a Lycra vest. And the PADI people were like, what do you mean? And I showed them the film and they were like, “Oh yeah, that definitely has to be reshot.”

Hmm, too much cleavage?

Haha. yeah. I also remember one of the images we shot for Fourth Element for Instagram got this huge complaint that we used a sexist image that was belittling to women. It was a photo of a woman in a bikini sitting in the back of the boat checking a gauge. You can’t see her backside, you can’t see anything. She’s just in a bikini. It’s very sporting. The screen grab of this image did the rounds among the Fourth Element women and everyone went, “What? How is that exploiting women?”

Again, I think we come back to the fact, there are quite a few crazies out there. There are a whole lot of people that will bag an image, because it was posted by PADI. I’ve also heard people from other tech agencies reacting to a GUE image with, “They’re the scientologists of the dive world. Don’t drink the Kool-Aid or you will all end up dressing the same.”

Oh yes, I’ve heard that one. However, it feels like things are slowly starting to change.

I think people in the dive industry are finally starting to realize that the competition for GUE isn’t IANTD or TDI. The competition for PADI isn’t SSI or RAID. It’s mountain biking and snowboarding and surfing and everything that is more easily accessible than entry into open water.

Photo of Afelandra Gonzalez by Luke Inman for Halcyon Dive Systems.

Toomer turned me on to that. The cycling market is HUGE! In fact, all of the sports you mention are way bigger than diving, and are generating way more money. However, most of the surface of the planet is water. That’s our conundrum.

The word is solidarity. We need more solidarity and a little bit more acceptance. That’s why I find it really encouraging to see companies willing to collaborate on some big campaigns that went through out the industry. To have, for example, Halcyon say, , we want to be on the Fourth Element shoot, even though Halcyon and GUE have this great relationship with SANTI.

We were inundated with our shoot at TEKDive USA, everybody wanted their products on it, Sub-Gravity, Aqua Lung, and Halcyon. And of course, manufacturers fall all over themselves to get their gear on a PADI shoot. It’s just nice to see that there is an understanding of how all boats float on a rising tide.

What could we do if we all worked together?

I think in the end, it comes down to inspiring people to dive. That’s what I want to do. In his speech at this year’s DEMA show [PADI CEO] Drew Richardson said that PADI and their agency were focused on making diving bigger, making the pie bigger and bringing people into diving. And they are doing it!

Photo of Afelandra Gonzalez by Luke Inman for Halcyon Dive Systems.

Just about everyone that knocks on my dive center door always says the same thing. They say, “I want to do my PADI.” PADI is the brand that’s bringing people in. And I think other brands, like Aqua Lung, Apex, Sherwood, all of the brands, should legitimately be looking at doing that too.

In addition to PADI, I see that you are now offering GUE classes at your store.

I have to say that the two agencies that I have found the most welcoming with less ego and less attitude are PADI and GUE, which is one of the reasons we have decided to  focus on those two. I am very happy and content to teach PADI and I can’t wait to start teaching GUE as well.

Luke Inman with the models and assistants he works with for Fourth Element, PADI, and Halcyon. From L to R:
Emma Baines (Fourth Elmt Brand mgr) Afelandra Gonzalez (model) Nina Moysi (photography assistant), Luke Inman (photographer), Ivonne Arambula (model), and Charlotte Holmes (model).

Solidarity?

Ok, I understand that GUE is not suddenly going to sit around a table with PADI and start cross-promoting, but I do think there needs to be more solidarity when people meet on dive boats, at resorts, or when they are working on projects.

Header Image: Photo of Charlotte Holmes by Luke Inman for Fourth Element.

Models:

Karla Rodriguez – PADI Divemaster, Masters degree in Reef Fish Ecology, Discovered hybridization in Parrot fish, Tech Diver, Fitness Instructor.

Charlotte Holmes – Former Miss England, MTV UK Presenter, Adidas London yoga and cross fit instructor. PADI Divemaster.

Afelandra Gonzalez – PADI Ambassadiver, Marine Biologist, PADI MSDT, TDI Intro to Tec Inst, GUE Fundies, discovered and named new species of Nudibranch.

Ivonne Arambula – PADI Open Water, Free Diver, Mother, Yoga and Crossfit Instructor.


Michael Menduno is InDepth’s executive editor and, an award-winning reporter and technologist who has written about diving and diving technology for 30 years. He coined the term “technical diving.” His magazine “aquaCORPS: The Journal for Technical Diving”(1990-1996), helped usher tech diving into mainstream sports diving. He also produced the first Tek, EUROTek, and AsiaTek conferences, and organized Rebreather Forums 1.0 and 2.0. Michael received the OZTEKMedia Excellence Award in 2011, the EUROTek Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012 and the TEKDive USA Media Award in 2018.


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Fiona Sharp, You Will Be Sorely Missed

As you have likely heard, we’ve lost one of the irrepressible and much-loved characters in the tech and diving medicine community, 55-year old Australian anesthesiologist and diving physician Fiona Sharp.

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By Rosemary E Lunn
Header photo by Catherine Meehan. Fiona in Sodwana Bay.

Fiona at BonaireTek. Photo by Michael Menduno.

One of the colorful characters in the field of diving medicine died tragically in a rebreather diving accident on Thursday, October 17, 2019. Fifty-five-year-old, Australian diving physician and anesthetist Dr. Fiona Sharp, MBBS, FANZCA, was found unresponsive on a reef at 24 m/80 f. She had been solo diving on a rebreather, and she was discovered with her mouthpiece out. Fiona was medevaced but did not regain consciousness. The incident occurred on the last day of Fiona’s diving trip to Bonaire, located in the Leeward Antilles, Carribean Sea. It was the week after Bonaire Tek. Fiona enjoyed deep rebreather diving and was known to be a bit of a maverick.

“We are shattered.” Bruce and Lynn Partridge, Shearwater Research.

Fiona at AsiaTek. Photo by Michael Menduno.

The disturbing news of Fiona’s death rocketed around the world in a few hours. Many people from the diving medicine and technical diving communities expressed their dismay and distress at Fiona’s death. She was gregarious, fun-loving, irrepressible, and generous. Fiona was a friendly colleague and we had dived together a few times. I wrote a heartfelt tribute about Fiona’s bulldozer attitude to life and diving, and this was published by X-Ray Mag. It includes a myriad of voices from around the globe and amply illustrates just how well-loved she was by her colleagues and friends. 

“Fiona was an individual. She did what she wanted. She did what she loved. She was very much her own person, and drove us mad at times. Fiona was down to earth, had a massive heart, a huge personality, and was very dear to all of us. She will be greatly missed.

Dr. Catherine Meehan

Fiona Sharp was born in May, 1964, in Perth, Australia, and she was bright! She attended Mercedes College Perth, where she was “Dux” in her graduating year. [Dux: from Latin for ‘leader,’ the term that is now used in Australia and New Zealand to indicate the highest-ranking student in a specific achievement). 

Fiona in Sodwana Bay. Photo by Catherine Meehan.

After leaving high school, Fiona studied medicine at the University of Western Australia where she graduated in 1989 as a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS UWA). After serving an internship in Perth in 1989, followed by a year as a junior Resident in Sydney, Fiona moved to England where she gained her Diploma of Anaesthesia (DA) in 1992, whilst working as a Senior House Officer in Anaesthetics in Southend, Essex.

Fiona then returned to Australia and commenced specialist Anaesthetics training. In 2000, she flew once again to the UK where she spent five years practicing diving medicine at DDRC Healthcare (Diving Diseases and Research) in Plymouth. During this period, she was awarded a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (FANZCA) Fellowship in 2004.

At the time of her death, Fiona Sharp was working at the Fiona Stanley Hyperbaric Medicine Unit (FSHHMU) in Perth, Western Australia. She had been in post since it opened in November 2014. Prior to that, she was employed at the HMU at Fremantle Hospital from 2007 to November 2014. (The department then relocated to the newly built department at FSH).

Fiona at an event with the Hyperbaric Technicians and Nurses Association. Photo courtesy of Catherine Meehan.

Whilst writing this, I spoke to Fiona’s family and asked: “why medicine?” They responded,

“If you are really smart at school, you are expected to be an architect, a lawyer, or a doctor. Medicine appealed to her; however, it was possible that she could have become a vet because the family did have a lot of animals.”

Fiona’s family

“She was nuts, about everything. But especially about diving.” 

Dirk Peterson

Fiona got into diving in her late teens after trying skydiving and scuba diving. Water prevailed and she learned to dive when she was 18 years old. She was a PADI Divemaster, cave certified and qualified to dive the Inspiration, Evolution, SF2, Drager Dolphin, Mark VI Poseidon, and JJ-CCR rebreathers. 

Fiona with Dr. Neal Pollock, Rosemary Lunn, and Dr. Richard “Harry” Harris at Rebreather Forum 3. Photo courtesy of Rosemary Lunn.

You cannot ever say that diving was her hobby. It was her all-encompassing great passion. Fiona recently told her older sister that she felt happiest when she was underwater. It was therefore natural that she would take an active interest in diving medicine, and she became a fixture at all the major diving medical or tech conferences. SPUMS, UHMS, EUBS, HTNA, as well as EUROTEK, OzTek, Rebreather Forum 3 and other diving industry events. These helped keep her current and educated in this niche sector. 

Fiona loved the diving, diving medicine, and the camaraderie around the bar. She was regularly first up and last to bed. Most often, Fiona could be heard well before she was seen on land and underwater!! She was well-loved by her colleagues at these events and, as many have said, the SPUMS Conference won’t be the same without her. I think she attended at least 17.” 

Dr. Neil Banham, Fiona Stanley Hospital

Fiona’s first South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society (SPUMS) Conference was at Layang, Layang island, in Malaysia in 1999,  a venue well suited to her type of diving because it was deep. It was at a later SPUMS, in 2008, that Fiona’s diving would change. Dr. Catherine Meehan takes up the story. 

I met Fiona at a SPUMS meeting about 20 years ago. In 2008, I chartered the ‘Golden Dawn’ liveaboard. Ten of us flew into Alotau in Papua. New Guinea. and we sailed and dived our way across to Kimbe Bay, West New Britain, to join the SPUMS annual scientific conference. There was a rebreather on board and Fiona had a guided rebreather dive. She enjoyed it so much that she dived with it for the rest of the week. I believe this was one of her earliest experiences rebreather diving, and I think that she embarked on her passion for diving rebreathers shortly afterward.

Catherine and Fiona would regularly dive together, at least two or three times a year, all over the world.

We did a lot of conferences and diving together. We were most recently in South Africa diving Sodwana Bay. She was dressed in her vibrant orange drysuit so it was easy to see where she was, doing her own thing. It was tough cold water diving, but she was very hardy and didn’t miss a dive, even when her suit leaked. It is a good lasting memory of her.”

It was like she had been shot out of a cannon when she entered a room.

Joanna Mikutowicz, DiveTech


Fiona Sharp never did anything by halves, and this is amply demonstrated by a classic Fiona story that her older sister Donna regaled to me.

Many years ago Fiona rang me up and said, ‘I have got two tickets to the rugby game on Friday night, do you want to come with me?’ I thought, ‘Why not?’ One of our kids plays rugby at school. I rocked up at the game and she said to me, ‘Here is your ticket. Don’t worry about paying. And by the way, these tickets are not just for tonight’s game. They are season tickets’.”

She goes on: 

“We ended up supporting the Western Force, a professional Perth-based rugby team, for the next twelve years and watched them play Super Rugby against New Zealand and South Africa. What I found ironic was that I went to nearly every game. I think Fiona missed more games than any of us because she was away diving so much.

Fiona Sharp drew no quarters when it came to life and diving. I only met her a few times, but she left an aircraft carrier shipwreck-sized impression on my psyche and we remained in contact.”

Laura James, Environmental Campaigner, Underwater Cinematographer

Many divers have been generous with their Fiona stories. Todd and Tiffany Winn of Silent O Solutions reached out to me with another classic Fiona tale and said I could share it. When Fiona decided you would be friends, the recipient really didn’t stand a chance. 

Fiona’s reputation as ‘difficult’ preceded her, and our first encounter with her was memorable, to say the least. It was in San Diego for an in-water recompression symposium and training event in 2014. She exceeded my expectations. I believe she only told me I was completely mistaken two or three times. I conceded two of three and agreed to disagree on the third. She had an uncanny ability to defuse my ire with a wry smirk. As she had already decided we’d be friends, I had little say in the matter.

Tiffany Winn
Fiona before a dive in Bonaire. Photo by Michael Menduno.

Tiff liked Fiona immediately and loved her unflinching honesty and authenticity. Fiona threatened to visit us on Maui on one of her transits across the globe, but unlike nearly everyone else she called and texted for a month straight, ironing out the details, and sure enough, one day, showed up. We loaded up our little boat for its maiden voyage, and Tiff and Fifi had a girl’s day rebreathering all by themselves. We had a beautiful day and a fabulous sunset. We will remember her fondly and often, and will miss her dearly.”

Todd Winn

It is only right that I leave the last words to her family. I was told that Fiona had wanted to climb Mount Everest, but she suffered so badly with altitude sickness, that she just about made it to base camp and no further. Fiona was always willing to take a risk, and push herself. Apparently she competed in triathlons in her early 20’s, and she liked challenges. Everyone who came into contact with her soon found out she had a very dry sense of humor.

Fiona didn’t like cheap champagne or wine. It had to be good quality and lots of it, and she always brought home two bottles of whiskey from every trip for her father.

Donna Sharp

Fiona was close to her family. She is survived by her mother, three sisters, a brother, and 18 cousins. She was an “oh so very proud” aunt to 13 nieces and nephews. Typically big-hearted and kind, Fiona had planned to take a nephew to Antarctica this November. You mad as a box of frogs lady, you will be missed. 

The author is very grateful for the assistance of the Sharp family and Dr. Neil Banham, Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at Fiona Stanley Hospital in writing this tribute. 


Dive industry fixer, Rosemary E Lunn (“Roz”) is the Business Development Director at The Underwater Marketing Company. This British firm specializes in providing marketing, communications, social media and event management for the “tecreational” and technical diving industry. Rosemary is a PADI IDC Staff Instructor, BSAC Advanced Instructor, Trimix, and CCR diver. Before moving into the public relations field, she worked as a professional recreational instructor, safety diver, and underwater model underwater and appeared on the History Channel and National Geographic documentaries. She established TEKDiveUSA and organized Rebreather Forum 3 on behalf of AAUS, DAN, and PADI. In 2008, Rosemary co-founded EUROTEK, the European advanced and technical diving biennial conference. She is a respected and prolific diving author, an SSI Platinum Diver, an Associate Member of the Women Divers Hall of Fame, and sits on the SITA Board (Scuba Industry Trade Association).

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