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The luxury steam yacht Gunilda was the flagship of the New York Yacht Club and the pride of its owner, oil baron William Harkness, one of the wealthiest men in the world at the turn of the century. Unfortunately, a penchant for cutting corners sent this vessel to a watery grave 240 ft/74m deep in Lake Superior.

Interestingly, the wreck served as a testing ground for one of the earliest open circuit mix dives, which was conducted in 1981 by Jerry Buchanon, Bob Horton and Joe Schneeweis using heliox (an oxygen-helium mix). It was also just named #2 in the Ten Best “Technical” Dive Sites in the World in the PADI TecRecBlog.

Here is a collection of a narration and videos of three GUE expeditions in 2012, 2002 and 2000 focused on documenting the famed shipwreck. The 2012 expedition was conducted using RB80s and includes GUE founder & president Jarrod Jablonski. Contrast the image quality of the 2012 and 2002/2000 expeditions!   

Click the image below to watch a short video about the wreck on GUE.tv

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Enjoy this photo gallery

Additional Resources:

Haunting video shows perfectly preserved wreck of classic steamship Gunilda
Ten Best “Technical” Dive Sites in the World


Terry Irvine is Director of Operations for a food manufacturing facility in Ontario, Canada, and holds an Honors BS in Agriculture.  He completed his full cave course with Jarrod Jablonski in 1995 and his trimix course with Jarrod the following year. Terry uses his cave and mixed gas training to explore and video wrecks of the Great Lakes.  He also enjoys cave diving when time permits.

Exploration

THE MARS PROJECT LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE

Since the spectacular discovery in 2011, a group of dedicated scientist and advanced divers has been engaged in documenting the impressive wreck site in order to unlock the many mysteries surrounding Mars and its violent destiny.

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Header image by Ocean Discovery

It was the largest and fiercest warship in the world, named Mars after the Roman
god of war. It went up in a ball of flames during a brutal naval battle in 1564,
consigning more than 800 Swedish and German sailors and a fortune in gold and
silver coins to the bottom of the Baltic Sea.

Since the spectacular discovery in 2011, a group of dedicated scientist and advanced divers has been engaged in documenting the impressive wreck site in order to unlock the many mysteries surrounding Mars and its violent destiny. The new website will provide lots of information to the public about the historic importance of the wreck and the exciting process to uncover its truths.

The team of divers, lead by Richard Lundgren, plan for dives on the wreck to help researchers learn about its history. Photo by Ocean Discovery.

During the last ten years, many groundbreaking digital documentation techniques have been developed, but in an effort to further enhance the possibilities, The Mars Project now seeks corporate sponsorship and private donations to secure the success of the field studies and to optimize the amount and the quality of data gathered every year.

Anybody interested in enhancing the field of maritime archeology by developing methods, techniques, and technology suitable for the underwater world should is welcome to get involved. Any contribution –large or small – will secure the ongoing scientific documentation of the Mars wreck site, and generally advance the field of maritime archeology.

Two divers on the Mars during project dives. Photo by Ocean Discovery.

Resources

www.mars-project.org

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