fbpx
Connect with us

Cave

Virtual Consensus on Mexican Cave Lines

Those who recall Mexico’s “line arrow wars” and numerous Florida skirmishes know that cave divers can be a contentious lot, especially when it comes to line options and placement. Fortunately, the Yucatan underground has come up with an innovative and what appears to be an effective solution for community decision-making as cave instructor and co-owner of Underwater Tulum Lanny Vogel delineates.

Published

on

By Lanny Vogel
Header Photo Courtesy of Lanny Vogel

The placement and marking of permanent guidelines in caves can be a controversial subject. The opinions of individual instructors, guides, and explorers will often differ, and when egos are involved, discussions can quickly get heated.  

Photo courtesy of Lanny Vogel.

The past, well-documented “line arrow wars” in Mexico involved a lot of unilateral line changes, the very sad removal of many of the original explorers’ arrows, and a great deal of tension in the community. Hardly better is an (alleged) situation in Florida where divers changing the lines in “their cave” reportedly had a fistfight in the parking lot, which had to be broken up by the local sheriff.

It makes sense then to establish some sort of line committee to be responsible for making decisions about safety and line placement, as well as advocating for cave conservation and good landowner relations. Historically, line committees have not been especially successful, either because many divers have felt that they are not adequately represented by the members, or because getting people with large egos and differing opinions around a table has been challenging.  

Recent initiatives in Mexico may point the way to a better solution. Using communications technology that we all carry in our pockets has provided a more convenient and democratic alternative to physical meetings. The virtual line committee operates under the umbrella of Comité Regional de Espeleobuceo, Ecología y Regulación, or “CREER,” which translates to “believe” in Spanish. It includes representatives from the Association of Aquatic Services Providers (APSA), the Union of Divers of the Caribbean (SBC), Mayab Speleological Circle (CEM), Diving in Cenotes and Mar (BUCEMA), and from independent instructors.

Photo courtesy of Lanny Vogel.

CREER is doing great work in liaising with local and federal authorities over the regulation of diving and has produced a rigorous new system for training and regulating cavern guides.

All votes on line changes are conducted using SurveyMonkey, a virtual survey software. This means that busy people do not have to travel and attend a meeting in order to make their views known but just need to pull out their phones and click a few buttons to have their voices be heard. To inform the decision-making process, there is also a private discussion group on Facebook. All votes, results, and decisions are announced via a website which is open to all and is a useful source of information for local and visiting cave divers.

In order to set up something that was going to work, it was important that any system be seen as democratic, fair, inclusive, and transparent, with communications in Spanish and English. A key part of this was ensuring that the system had the consent of the majority of the cave diving community. The first vote was, therefore, to see if the community wanted a virtual line committee at all. Fortunately, this was unanimously agreed upon.

The next steps were to agree on parameters regarding who should vote, and to elect moderators. Following numerous discussions, it was decided that the criteria for voting was to be a Full Cave instructor or equivalent, have active teaching status with a recognized agency, be a legal resident in Mexico, and have worked in the region eight months a year or more.  Seven moderators were democratically elected to administer the line committee (Alex Alvarez, Luis Leal, Lanny Vogel, Kim Davidson, Vicente Fito, Vincent Rouquette-Cathala, and Natalie Gibb). It is an important part of the system that the moderators not have any more voting power than anyone else, but that they make certain the system runs smoothly, and safeguard online discussions to keep them respectful and on-topic.

So far, the community has democratically decided:

  • The type of lines that should be used in various types of caves:
    • Caverns where cavern tours take place – Gold Kernmantle Line
    • High traffic caves and designated training caves – White #24 Braided Line
    • Other caves – White Twisted or Braided Line – #18, #21 or #24
  • Jumps on Quintana Roo cave lines should have a minimum distance between lines of 2 m/6 ft, maximum of 10 m/30 ft.
  • Jumps should be marked with an arrow, unless there is a compelling reason not to, such as cave conservation, preservation of a scientific project or ongoing exploration.
  • The Taak Bi Ha Cavern Line should be re-routed slightly for safety and conservation, and jumps to the cave from the Cavern Line should be cut back to a distance of at least 2 m/6 ft.
  • To install a rerouted cavern line at Carwash that remains in the cavern zone and is a compromise to facilitate both cavern tours and cave training. 
  • To install two permanent cavern lines at Casa Cenote.
Photo courtesy of Lanny Vogel.

Anyone can make a suggestion to be considered by the virtual committee, and some future decisions that have been suggested include updating the list of approved “training caves,” standardization of the information on permanent markers (jump names, penetration distances), and numerous suggested safety improvements.  Any changes will only be implemented if more than two-thirds of the voting cave instructors agree, ensuring that we avoid controversial decisions with a narrow margin.

It is early days for the virtual line committee, but it is very positive that we have already seen the cave diving community coming together to make decisions that affect us all. Some democratic decisions have been contrary to what the moderators think would be best, but in a perverse way that is one of the coolest things about the system. Winston Churchhill once said that “democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others,” which is something that applies equally to decisions made in cave diving.
You can find out more about the work of the virtual line committee and get updates on line changes and repairs on the website. Contact any of the cave diving instructors involved for suggestions on how to implement something similar in your community.




Lanny Vogel is a full-time cave instructor based in Tulum, Mexico. He is the joint owner of Underworld Tulum and the founder of the annual Cave Camp event. Originally from the UK, he retired from the Royal Navy in 2014 to cave dive full time

Cave

No Dicretion Home: Un’avventura di immersioni in grotta Slovena

Affetto dal blocco di Covid, il giovane, poetico esploratore italiano, istruttore e produttore di ingranaggi, Andrea Murdock Alpini, ha deciso di prendere le distanze sociali al massimo! Ha preparato il suo furgone delle caverne appositamente progettato e ha intrapreso un viaggio da solista di tre settimane per immergersi nelle grotte piene d’acqua che si trovano sotto il suolo sloveno. Il suo rapporto e il registro video, soprannominato “No Direction Home”, un omaggio al docu di Bob Dylan di Scorsese, probabilmente soddisferanno quei più profondi impulsi di avventura. Ho menzionato la colonna sonora assassina? I bambini non lo provano a casa!

Published

on

By

Testo: Andrea Murdock Alpini

Foto & Video: Andrea Murdock Alpini.

Un ringraziamento speciale a Cristina Condemi per la sua assistenza editoriale.

Here is the story translated into English

L’autore del testo e delle immersioni solitarie in grotta non vuole incentivare in nessun modo la pratica della subacquea solitaria. Il viaggio e le immersioni descritte dell’articolo sono il frutto di un lungo addestramento.

Nota editore: Global Underwater Explorers non autorizza le immersioni in solitario.

Voglia di libertà e distacco è stato lo spirito con cui agli inizi dello scorso mese di giugno sono partito alla volta di un viaggio in solitaria tra grotte, laghi alpini e miniere abbandonate.

Il #lockdown era finito da poche settimane, la scottatura del forzato distanziamento sociale si percepiva ancora molto forte. In tasca avevo un paio di lettere editoriali fornitemi dalla redazione di Nautica Report, il passaporto.  Il WreckVan per l’occasione era stato riconvertito a CaveVan ricolmo di bombole, miscele trimix, compressore a scoppio a 300bar, booster, bi-bombola di vari tagli, zaini, scarponi da montagna, pinne, tenda e fornelletto, mute stagne e nuovi prodotti di intimo termico di PHY Diving Equipment che dovevo testare prima di metterli in produzione.

Quando ho varcato il confine con la Slovenia mi sono emozionato.
In poche ore sono passato dal non poter andare oltre i 200m dalla mia abitazione a potermi muovere liberamente nella natura. Lo stacco mentale fu enorme. Ho fatto una sola telefonata dall’estero, la sera di arrivo, dopo funambolici colloqui in russo al termine del primo violento temporale che mi avrebbe accompagnato sotto forma di pioggia battente per altre tre lunghe, interminabili settimane.

Il mio viaggio avrebbe dovuto articolarsi tra Slovenia, Lago di Garda, Sud Tirolo, Austria, Alpi Apuane, l’Altopiano di Campo Imperatore sotto il massiccio del Gran Sasso e infine la Majaella. Le piogge hanno stravolto la mia pianificazione rendendo pericolose e inagibili molte grotte e miniere che avevo preventivato. Così dopo oltre venti giorni trascorsi a montare smontare la tenda, dormendo al freddo e con poche ore di sonno sono rientrato distrutto e claudicante verso casa.

Ho filmato tutto il viaggio con il solo dispositivo che tutti portiamo sempre in tasca: il telefono cellulare, null’altro. 

Avrei voluto raccontare la mia esperienza subacquea dal punto di vista del viaggio terrestre in cui l’acqua altro non è una parte del contesto. Tre capitoli compongono questa mini serie sulla Slovenia. 

Il primo giorno di grotte in Slovenia è stato rocambolesco per certi versi. Tuttavia ancora non sapevo cosa mi avrebbe riservato il secondo giorno. 

Attorno alle sei del mattino inizio a preparami per uscire. Piove ovunque, vento freddo e secchiate di acqua. La maggior parte delle grotte in entroterra sono inagibili, penso. Guardo più a sud, verso il confine con la Croazia. Attraverso la Slovenia da nord a sud, mi imbatto in un villaggio abbandonato, visito qualche malga campestre poi riparto alla volta del confine.



Mentre consumo un fugace pasto da campo preparato a bordo grotta, tra muschi e licheni, appena terminata l’immersione a Bilpa, la polizia di frontiera e l’esercito mi raggiungono per il controllo passaporto accompagnato da altra burocrazia. Tutto va per il meglio. Torno così alla mia zuppa e poco dopo mi metto in viaggio, di nuovo. Uno spiraglio di sole mi scalda le ossa e tempra il clima dentro il CaveVan. 

Rientrato al campo base pianifico la giornata dell’indomani e decido di dedicarla unicamente ai sopralluoghi speleo, da est a ovest da nord a sud, di diverse coordinate GPS che mi sono annotato. Guido per molte ore e ne cammino altrettante tra sentieri nei boschi o in aperta campagna. Ritornerò al mio letto distrutto e affamato, dove mi preparò un nuovo brodo caldo accompagnato da abbondante parmigiano e frutta secca per dessert! 

Fisarmoniche inaspettate all’uscita dalla foresta, orsi, fiumi in piena dentro le grotte e un doppio turno di verifica (mattutino e pomeridiano) alla stupenda grotta di Suha Dolca per monitorarne la fattibilità.

NO DIRECTION HOME è entrato nel vivo dello spirito di viaggio, natura solitaria. Questo è ciò che è successo nei giorni centrali della trasferta in Slovenia, questi sono alcuni dei passaggi raccontati nel secondo video capitolo della serie supportata da PHY Diving Equipment.

In tasca sempre e soltanto il mio cellulare per filmare le giornate e le esperienze vissute sul campo, nella testa una miriade di pensieri, negli scarponi una moltitudine di storie da tramandare.

Due giornate di stop forzato per le piogge abbondanti mi hanno costretto in superficie. Ho speso il tempo per sopralluoghi e organizzando i primi materiali raccolti dal viaggio in Slovenia.

Gli appunti di grotte e coordinate andavano riordinati e con essi anche le idee su come procedere. Ho rinunciato a diversi spot pensando di ritornarci in un’altra stagione, magari d’inverno, come piace me. Certo le condizioni esterne non sarebbero delle più facili però le condizioni dell’acqua all’interno delle grotte sarebbero sicuramente più stabili e gestibili. 

Sono tornato spesso sui miei passi alla ricerca delle condizioni favorevoli, quasi sempre l’acqua mi ha indicato la via del rientro, dopo alcuni sguardi mi ha convinto a girare le spalle alle spelonche e riprendere il mio sentiero.

Il terzo capitolo sloveno NO DIRECTION HOME è quello a cui sono maggiormente legato. L’indecisione dell’ultimo giorno se restare ancora e aspettare condizioni migliori oppure partire, mettermi gli orsi e le grotte alle spalle per tornare in Italia. Sapevo che mi avrebbe aspettato qualche relitto sul Lago di Garda e poi avrei iniziato a risalire la china verso il Sud Tirolo e da lì ai laghi alpini in Austria. 

Stanco, affaticato e con lo sguardo che corre più lento dei pensieri decido di fare un ultimo tentativo a Suha Dolca prima di dire definitiva conclusa la mia avventura in Slovenia. Torno al lago che antecede la grotta, il paesaggio e stupendo avvolto nell’ora pomeridiana. Scendo lungo il sentiero che conduce all’imbocco dell’antro. 

Verifico le condizioni, finalmente la grotta è agibile!

Preparo le attrezzature, scendo molteplici volte il sentiero per portare pezzo a pezzo tutto l’equipaggiamento al punto di vestizione. Nell’ultimo viaggio, quando ho già muta stagna indossata, incontro un paio di cave divers sloveni con cui scambio alcune battute. Il tempo di salutarsi e mi preparo per entrare finalmente in acqua e raggiungere l’ingresso di Suha Dolca. 

Riemergerò tra migliaia di canne spezzate dal vento che creano un tappeto naturale che fluttua sulla superficie dell’acqua. Mi sento un po’ un castoro. Alle 21.30 circa oltrepasso il confine con l’Italia.


Andrea Murdock Alpini is a TDI and CMAS technical trimix and advanced wreck-overhead instructor based in Italy. He is fascinated by deep wrecks, historical research, decompression studies, caves, filming, and writing. He holds a Master’s degree in Architecture and an MBA in Economics for The Arts. Andrea is also the founder of Phy Diving Equipment. His life revolves around teaching open circuit scuba diving, conducting expeditions, developing gear, and writing essays about his philosophy of wreck and cave diving. Recently he published his first book entitled, Deep Blue: storie di relitti e luoghi insoliti.

Continue Reading

Thank You to Our Sponsors

Subscribe

Education, Conservation, and Exploration articles for the diving obsessed. Subscribe to our monthly blog and get our latest stories and content delivered to your inbox every Thursday.

Latest Features